When most people think of drag, they probably envision a binary transformation. A cisgender man becomes a familiar, exaggerated version of a woman. A cisgender woman is made up to look like a man. Sasha Velour knows that’s only the beginning.

“What I want to do with drag is always to create a character that has fluidity and queerness built into it,” Velour tells Jezebel. “So I’m not trying to achieve a familiar idea of gender. I’m trying to hopefully achieve some many different new possibilities.”

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Velour’s one-queen show, Smoke and Mirrors, explores Velour’s own experiences with gender, fame, and family and is on tour now.

producer, jezebel

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DISCUSSION

JaneLucPicard
Jane-Luc Picard

Good. Perhaps this is a controversial opinion but I find non-artistic drag to be insulting. Some cis man gets to put on the clothing that patriarchy has told women to wear, play around in the makeup we are judged for skipping in the mornings, and then wash it off and return to their privilege. How droll! How fun! Look at you, in those heels that you never once thought about as a tool of oppression. The dress that you wear comfortably without thinking about how you have to walk home down an unsavoury street.

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