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Buckingham Palace wants to make crystal clear that they do not endorse The Crown and indeed the actual Crown has no thoughts on the subject of this television program for the masses whatsoever.

Publicity is already gearing up for season three of The Crown, coming in November, and the Guardian recently ran a big piece on the show, which included this bit from creator Peter Morgan:

Morgan’s characters are not the fictional Soprano family, nor characters from Greek myth, but real and (mostly) living people. It is a measure of The Crown’s proximity to the crown that, Morgan tells me, he meets members of the royal household four times a year – “people who are very high-ranking and very active within the organisation” – and, “respectfully, I tell them what I have in mind, and they brace themselves slightly”. But only slightly.

Well, today the Guardian has followed up by publishing a letter to the editor from Donal McCabe, the queen’s communications secretary, clarifying that The Crown does NOT have the Buckingham Palace seal of approval. The initial article “may have the unfortunate consequence of leading your readers to believe that the television series The Crown is made with some sort of endorsement by the royal household, or an acceptance by the royal household that the drama is factually accurate,” began McCabe. He continued!

We appreciate that readers of the Guardian may enjoy this fictionalised interpretation of historical events but they should do so knowing that the royal household is not complicit in interpretations made by the programme.

The royal household has never agreed to vet or approve content, has not asked to know what topics will be included, and would never express a view as to the programme’s accuracy.

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No “we hate it”; no “we love it.” Strictly “I don’t know her.”