Drake's 'In My Feelings' Video Is Great Advertising for the City of New Orleans

Sweet relief has come at last, for no longer will I associate Drake’s “In My Feelings” with celebrities and Instagram randos doing the Shiggy dance.

Advertisement

In the video for “In My Feelings,” directed by Karena Evans, we have physical proof that Drake is over dancehall (for the time being) and has moved right along to bounce music. Big Freedia’s in here! Yung Miami’s holding court from the top balcony of Dat Dog on Frenchmen Street. Drake KNOWS New Orleans and he’s ready and willing and able to show you how much he knows, OK?

A minor quibble —Drake’s New Orleans accent is stressful, but not nearly as stressful as the fact that lurking somewhere within this short film are the children from Stranger Things and also Backpack Kid. Let’s focus on the positive, yes?

Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Drakes In My Feelings Video Is Great Advertising for the City of New Orleans

Here’s Keke (Lala Anthony), telling Drake he’s “too old to be on somebody’s front lawn, acting like this.”

Illustration for article titled Drakes In My Feelings Video Is Great Advertising for the City of New Orleans

And this is Phylicia Rashad, Keke’s mom. “I want you to leave. And don’t forget to go when you leave.” Ma’am... same!

Advertisement

Most of the video is shot like a hazy, humid dream, just happy people on every street corner and doorway throughout the city, clutching a daiquiri in one hand and dancing with a studied insouciance—a perfect summer mood.

Managing Editor, Jezebel

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

optimusprimeday
OptimusPrimeDay

Drake, a seasoned artist with genuine talent, is 31 years old, but feels contradicted by the juvenile spirit of this song’s lackluster lyrical content, reinforced by his hackneyed music video performance. Radiating an exaggerated swagger of youth culture, Drake’s reached that position in an aging pop culture phenomenon’s life when the idea of genuine artistic growth and the risk that requires is all too often overshadowed by the creeping fear of irrelevancy and its need to rely on crude formula as a clear means of career extension.